On Semi SiC modules for EV designs

June 14, 2021 // By Nick Flaherty
On Semi SiC modules for EV designs
The 1200 V M1 full SiC planar MOSFET 2 pack modules from On Semiconductor are suited to a drive voltage in the range of 18-20 V with simple to drive negative gate voltages.

On Semiconductor has launched two 1200 V full silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFET modules for electric vehicle (EV) designs.

The 1200 V M1 full SiC planar MOSFET 2 pack modules are suited to a drive voltage in the range of 18-20 V with simple to drive negative gate voltages. The larger die reduces thermal resistance compared to trench MOSFETs, reducing die temperature at the same operating temperature.

Configured as a 2-PACK half bridge, the NXH010P120MNF is a 10 mohm device housed in an F1 package while the NXH006P120MNF2 is a 6 mohm device in an F2 package. The packages have press-fit pins for industrial applications and an embedded negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistor for temperature monitoring.

The SiC MOSFET modules have been designed to work alongside driver solutions such as the NCD5700x devices. The NCD57252 dual channel isolated IGBT/MOSFET gate driver offers 5 kV of galvanic isolation and can be configured for dual low-side, dual high-side or half-bridge operation.

The NCD57252 is housed in a small SOIC-16 wide body package and accepts logic level inputs (3.3 V, 5 V & 15 V). The high current device (source 4.0 A / sink 6.0 A at Miller plateau voltage) is suitable for high-speed operation as typical propagation delays are 60ns.

The recently-announced 650 V SiC MOSFETs employ a novel active cell design combined with advanced thin wafer technology enabling a best-in-class figure of merit (FoM) for (RDS(on)*area). Devices in the series such as the NVBG015N065SC1, NTBG015N065SC1, NVH4L015N065SC1 and NTH4L015N065SC offer the lowest RDS(on) in the market for D2PAK7L / TO247 packaged MOSFETs.

The 1200 V and 900 V N-channel SiC MOSFETs feature a small chip size that reduces device capacitance and gate charge with Qg as low as 220 nC, reducing switching losses when operating at the high frequencies demanded by EV chargers.

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